Archived entries for ALIS

UbiComp 2010: Slides and Poster

ast month’s Ubiquitous Computing conference in beautiful Copenhagen was really worthwhile. Saw a lot of great work, met many interesting people, and enjoyed the amazing food and hospitality of Denmark. Thanks to the organizers for a great experience.

Here are the slides I presented in the Ubiquitous Computing for Sustainable Energy workshop on our paper, Supporting Sustainable Living: Aware Homes and Smart Occupants [PDF].

And the poster I presented on ALIS: An Interactive Ecosystem for Sustainable Living [PDF]:

Click for PDF

After the excellent experience I had in Copenhagen, I’m eager to attend next year’s conference in Beijing, which promises to be another fantastic event.

Architect Magazine recognizes North House with a 2010 R&D Award


orth House has been awarded a 2010 R&D Award by Architect Magazine. These jury-selected awards are based on criteria of performance, aesthetics, and progressive thinking. Way to go Team North!

Full write-up on our research group blog: Human-Centered Systems for Sustainable Living.

UbiComp 2010: Copenhagen, here I come!

his month, I got the exciting news that I’ll be traveling to Copenhagen, Denmark in September to attend UbiComp 2010! I’ll be participating in three capacities:

  • as a presenter for a poster on ALIS (below) that I co-authored with Lyn Bartram,
  • as a presenter for a workshop paper on Aware Homes and Smart Occupants in the Ubiquitous Computing for Sustainable Energy workshop, alongside Lyn Bartram and Rob Woodbury, and
  • as a student volunteer!

I’ve never been a volunteer at an academic conference before, so I’m stoked to take part in that respect, and the workshop will be a great opportunity to meet others in our part of the field, and share our ideas. I’m very excited about the opportunity.

The poster presents the motivation and design rationale behind ALIS, the Aware Living Interface System, that has been deployed in North House and West House. The major components of the system are presented, and a few of the lessons learned are discussed. The abstract will be available in the conference proceedings, and archived in the ACM Digital Library.

J. Rodgers, L. Bartram. “ALIS: An Interactive Ecosystem for Sustainable Living.” Proceedings of UbiComp 2010.

Engaging occupants in conservation efforts is a key part of reducing our ecological footprint. To this end, we have developed the Aware Living Interface System (ALIS), an integrated in-home system that supports residents in awareness of resource use, facilitates efficient control of house systems, and encourages conservation in daily activities. Initial responses from deployments in two high- profile sustainable homes indicate the potential and challenges involved in supporting sustainable living.

Our workshop paper goes into more depth on the same topic, exploring our design rationale and process during the development of ALIS. I’m very interested to learn what others in the field have been doing in regards to sustainability and conservation.

See you in Scandinavia!

Chasing the Negawatt: Visualization for Sustainable Living

y first publication as a Masters student has hit the digital shelves! It’s now available from the publisher and in the ACM Digital Library. It’s exciting to see our work in print. Our thanks to Theresa Marie-Rhyne and Dennis Taylor for their support and for editing and helping us prepare the document for publication.

L. Bartram, J. Rodgers and K. Muise. “Chasing the negawatt: Visualization for Sustainable Living.” IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 30 (3), pp. 6-12, 2010.

Information visualization has an important role in enabling residents to understand and manage their use of resources in the home. Existing solutions designed for building managers in industrial and commercial contexts don’t account for the diverse factors at play in effective visualization of residential energy consumption. Such factors include placement, visibility, aesthetics, and integration with an information and visualization ecosystem. To provide a viable solution for homes, researchers developed the Adaptive Living Interface System (ALIS). ALIS is the interactive computing and information visualization backbone of North House, a net-zero home that placed fourth in the 2009 Solar Decathlon. This combination of green building methods with pervasive visualization technologies could be a powerful vehicle for encouraging conservation in a residential setting. However, simply transferring current approaches into the residential environment is inappropriate. Also, evaluation of these techniques involves myriad challenges.

Two papers submitted

long with Dr. Lyn Bartram and my colleague Kevin Muise, I’ve recently submitted two papers for publication. The first, which has been reviewed and accepted, will be published in the Visualization Viewpoints column of IEEE Computer Graphics & Applications in the spring of 2010.

Bartram, L., Rodgers, J. and Muise, K. (2010). Chasing the Negawatt: Visualization for Sustainable Living.

Information visualization has an important role to play in enabling residents to understand and manage their use of resources in the home. Existing solutions designed for building managers in industrial and commercial contexts do not account for the diversity of factors at play in effective visualization of residential energy consumption. In this discussion, we discuss several of these factors, such as placement, visibility, aesthetics, and integration with an information and visualization ecosystem. We then discuss how we applied our research to the design of ALIS (Adaptive Living Interface System), the interactive computing and information visualization backbone of North House, a net-zero home that placed 4th in the 2009 Solar Decathlon. We envision this combination of green building methods with pervasive visualization technologies as a powerful vehicle for helping to encourage conservation in a residential setting. However, we highlight that simply transferring current approaches into the residential environment is inappropriate. Finally, we briefly address the myriad challenges involved in the evaluation of these techniques.

The second has been submitted to the CHI Work-In-Progress stream as an extended abstract and poster submission. We’ll find out in February if the submission has been accepted.

Rodgers, J., Bartram, L., and Muise, K. (2010). ALIS: Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living.

In this paper we describe the design of ALIS (Adaptive Living Interface System), a distributed system of control and feedback interfaces to support sustainable living in an alternative energy home. ALIS was developed for North House, a net-zero energy home that placed 4th in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2009. We present the context and goals of our research, outline the components of the system we are developing and suggest that they comprise an interactive ecosystem, and discuss the challenges and successes we have experienced during the process. Finally, we position this work in relation to our broader research agenda into human-centered systems for sustainable living and our continued work on ALIS.


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